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Population 2018, n°2
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Population 2018, n°2

2018, 240 pages

Papier

n° ISBN 9782733220306

20,00 €

Migration from French Overseas Departments to Metropolitan France: What We Can Learn about a State Policy from the Censuses, 1962-1999

Marine Haddad, Winner of the 2018 Young Author Prize

Abortion Around the World: An Overview of Legislation, Measures, Trends, and Consequences

Agnès Guillaume, Clémentine Rossier

 Caring for a Dependent Elderly Parent: Care Arrangements and Sibling Interactions in France

Quitterie Roquebert, Roméo Fontaine, Agnès Gramain

Immigrants’ Spatial Incorporation in Housing and Neighbourhoods: Evidence from France

Haley McAvay

Does Time Count? Use of Parental Leave for a First Child in Sweden

Eleonora Mussino, Ann-Zolfie Duvander, Li Ma

 

Migration from French Overseas Departments to Metropolitan France: What We Can Learn about a State Policy from the Censuses, 1962-1999

Marine Haddad
This article offers new perspectives for demographic analysis of four French overseas départements (DOM): Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, and Réunion. What are the effects of public population policies, notably those implemented by the Office for DOM migration (Bureau pour la migration des DOM, Bumidom, 1963–1981) on migration to metropolitan France? French census data from 1968 to 1999 are used to measure the size and structure of migration flows over time, as well as their scale, expressed as a proportion of the DOM populations. Using difference-in-difference regressions, this study assesses the effects of the policies
implemented by the Bumidom. It shows that while the Bumidom accelerated the growth of migration flows, they were also fuelled by the socioeconomic gap between the DOMs and metropolitan France. Given that places in higher education and the share of high school graduates in the DOMs do not increase at the same pace as in metropolitan France, the rise of educational aspirations also appears to be a push factor. A comparison of DOM residents remaining at home and those who migrate to metropolitan France shows that since 1968 the latter have been characterized by a higher level of education.

Abortion Around the World: An Overview of Legislation, Measures, Trends, and Consequences

Agnès Guillaume, Clémentine Rossier
 Abortion is a fertility regulation practice that women use in the absence of contraception or when contraceptives fail. Laws regulating this practice in different countries range from allowing it on request to restrictive access and even total prohibition. Where the right to abortion is established, it is frequently challenged. Debates around legalization are centred on the rights of women, the rights of the embryo, and the health consequences of unsafe abortions. But whether abortion is legal or prohibited, women around the world resort to it, with great disparities in the intensity of the practice and its health and social consequences. Levels of safety of abortions varies widely between countries and regions (safe, less safe, and least safe). They have improved with the spread of medical abortion, particularly in countries with legal limits on access, where they replace riskier methods. The available data are highly heterogeneous: from healthcare statistics in countries where abortion is legal, to survey data of varying levels of completeness, and including the use of sophisticated methods to estimate levels in countries where legal access is restricted.

 Caring for a Dependent Elderly Parent: Care Arrangements and Sibling Interactions in France

Quitterie Roquebert, Roméo Fontaine, Agnès Gramain
Using data from the Household section of the Handicap-Santé (Disability and health) survey, (INSEE-DREES, 2008), this article studies kin support arrangements for dependent older adults in France. The first part is descriptive, showing how the care provided by adult children is affected by the parent’s conjugal situation, sibship size and birth order. The second part analyses families with two adult children and shows that the observed differences in care involvement by birth order are due to three factors: differences in individual characteristics between elder and younger siblings, differences in the impacts of these characteristics on the caregiving decision, and a difference in the adjustment of one sibling to the behaviour of the other (endogenous interactions). The impact of family characteristics seems fairly similar for elder and younger siblings, especially the strong tendency for the woman to be the caregiver if her sibling is a man, but the behaviour of the younger children reflects a compromise between the costs and benefits of caregiving. Defining aid more narrowly as help with daily life tasks, just one major explanation of the differences remains: with a given set of individual and family characteristics, there is an asymmetry in adjustment to the caregiving behaviour of the other child.

Immigrants’ Spatial Incorporation in Housing and Neighbourhoods: Evidence from France

Haley McAvay
Using the French Trajectories and Origins (TeO) survey, this article investigates the housing and neighbourhood outcomes of immigrants and their descendants across five major national origins. Drawing on classic theories of immigrants’ spatial incorporation, we explore the factors contributing to housing tenure disparities between
immigrants and the French mainstream population. Simultaneous equations models are also used to document the different ways in which housing and  neighbourhood outcomes intertwine across groups. While signs of assimilation into homeownership are found based on length of stay and generation, public housing occupancy is strongly dependent on immigrant origin net of other factors. First and second generations of North African, sub-Saharan African and Turkish origin are substantially more likely to live in the sector than other groups. They also have a higher net probability of living in public housing in neighbourhoods with high shares of immigrants, pointing to spatial sorting of public housing residents based on origin.

Does Time Count? Use of Parental Leave for a First Child in Sweden

Eleonora Mussino, Ann-Zolfie Duvander, Li Ma
This study aims to investigate immigrant fathers’ use of parental leave for a first child in Sweden from 1995 to 2010. The issue of immigrant fathers’ uptake of parental leave is particularly well suited to assess the integrative aspects of family policies and for studying immigrants’ integration because it reflects labour market participation and acceptance of gender-equal parental norms. Using data from Swedish population registers, we find that immigrant fathers do take parental leave but not to the same extent as Swedish-born fathers do, and they do not respond equally to policy changes. Our most important finding is that immigrant fathers
increase their leave use with time spent in Sweden, indicating an adaptation to the leave-use pattern of Swedish-born fathers. We also find that individual income, as well as the mothers’ characteristics, are strong determinants of parental leave use.